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Micajah Clark

July 21, 2010 will mark the 202nd anniversary of the death of Micajah Clark, born September 16, 1718 and died July 21, 1808. Clark was the son of Christopher Clark (1681-1754) and his wife Penelope (1684-1760). He married Judith Lewis Adams about 1736. The couple had twelve children: Christopher (1737-1803), Robert (1738-?), Mourning (1740-?), Micajah (1740/41-?), John (1743-?), Edward (1745-?), Penelope (1747-?), Judith (1749-?), Bolling (1741-?), Elizabeth Ann (1754-1810), James (1757-?), and William (1760-?). I descend from their daughter Elizabeth Ann, who married her cousin Joseph Anthony (1750-1810).

Here are some images from a transcription of Micajah Clark’s family Bible done by Samuel T. Moorman in 1832:

Clark and many of his sons were Revolutionary War soldiers. If you are looking to prove your lineage to Clark for DAR or similar applications, be careful that you have the right Micajah Clark. The name was used in the family for well over 200 years in several cadet branches, and it can be confusing. A biographical sketch of Clark’s grandson Anselm Anthony describes Micajah Clark as a “Colonel” in the Revolutionary War, but I haven’t seen any other references to his rank or service. He does appear on rosters of Revolutionary War soldiers.

Clark was born in St. Paul’s Parish, New Kent County, Virginia. Many publications list his birthplace as Hanover County, which was not created until 1720. He was living in Hanover County in 1737 when his oldest son Christopher was born, but it is difficult to say with certainty exactly where he lived when his next five children were born. The family moved to Albemarle County between 1745 and 1747. Clark first appears in records for Fredericksville Parish and Albemarle County in March 1747. Here in Albemarle County, he was a neighbor of Thomas Jefferson. Many publications refer to Micajah Clark as a surveyor and particularly mention that he surveyed land for Thomas Jefferson; however, no documentation exists to substantiate these claims.

Given the surnames Lewis through his wife Judith’s mother Mourning Lewis and his own Clark surname, it is tempting to surmise a connection to Lewis and Clark, the famous explorers, and there probably is one, given where the families of both Lewis and Clark lived, but I have not been able to to determine what that connection is.

Resource: Colonial Virginia Connections by Linda Starr.

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